Posts Tagged ‘william shakespeare’

Next Page »

Shakespeare: Money By Vile Means

Posted by admin on Friday, September 23, 2022

Meaning of William Shakespeare Money Quote: saying not to earn dirty money rather sell body parts for cash. William Shakespeare said:
 
raise no money by vile means. By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas Quote
 

“For I can raise no money by vile means. By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

William Shakespeare: Pay All Debt

Posted by admin on Saturday, February 12, 2022

William Shakespeare Money Quote saying that when you die, consider all debt paid off. William Shakespeare said:
 
He that dies pays all debts Quote
 

“He that dies pays all debts” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is referring to death as a way for a person to escape their financial debts or obligations.

The interpretation is that by dying, one avoids having to repay any money they owe or settle outstanding accounts. Shakespeare seems to be suggesting that death provides a way to ultimately clear oneself of all monetary liabilities.

The underlying message is that mortality means one’s debts die with them, as they will no longer be around to pay what is due after passing away.

William Shakespeare: Take Means

Posted by admin on Friday, August 21, 2020

William Shakespeare Money Quote saying that taking a means of livelihood is much the same as taking a life. William Shakespeare said:
 
You take my life when you do take the means whereby I live Quote
 

“You take my life when you do take the means whereby I live” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is expressing that one’s livelihood and means of survival are extremely important to keep.

The interpretation is that if someone were to take away another’s ability to earn a living or access resources necessary to live, it would be seen nearly equivalent to taking their actual life.

Shakespeare suggests that without the “means whereby” one sustains themselves through work, income or possessions, life itself becomes threatened.

The overall message seems to be that depriving someone of their livelihood or means of support takes away their ability to live and function in the world, and should thus be viewed very seriously.

Shakespeare: Pride & Fortunes Fell

Posted by admin on Friday, January 10, 2020

Meaning of Shakespeare Money Quote: elevated pride will be deflated when overinflated bank accounts are burst. Shakespeare said:
 
My pride fell with my fortunes Quote
 

“My pride fell with my fortunes” — Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is expressing how one’s pride or sense of self can become diminished along with a decline in financial standing or “fortunes”.

The interpretation is that the character’s pride and wealth were intertwined, so when their fortunes or wealth fell, their pride followed suit.

Shakespeare seems to be conveying that pride and status in society can be closely tied to material conditions and economic circumstances for some.

The underlying message is that loss of wealth and social standing has the power to correspondingly damage pride and one’s sense of self-worth.

William Shakespeare: Pay Too Much Freely

Posted by admin on Tuesday, September 12, 2017

William Shakespeare Money Quote saying saying via Camillo in ‘The Winters Tale’ that even when a gift is generously given, you can expect payment will be exacted. William Shakespeare said:
 
You pay a great deal too dear for what's given freely Quote
 

“You pay a great deal too dear for what’s given freely” — William Shakespeare

 
Birthday April 23, 1564 – Died April 23, 1616
 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is suggesting that something obtained without cost may have greater value than something purchased at a high price.

The interpretation is that Shakespeare views things given or received freely as more worthwhile than those that require an excessive financial payment.

The underlying message seems to be that what is willingly given holds more worth than what must be dearly bought, and that it is better to receive something as a gift than to overpay for it.

Overall, the quote conveys that free benefits are not properly appreciated if taken for granted or exchanged for something that demands too high a monetary worth.

#TalkLikeShakespeareDay April 23

William Shakespeare: Loans Hurt Friendship

Posted by admin on Sunday, March 8, 2015

William Shakespeare Money Quotation saying in Hamlet that losses on loans come to both parties when they start as friends. William Shakespeare said:
 
Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend Quote
 

Neither a borrower nor a lender be; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry
– William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is advising against both borrowing and lending money.

His interpretation is that borrowing can result in losing both the money loaned as well as damaging the friendship with the lender if it’s not repaid. Additionally, he suggests that borrowing dulls one’s motivation to be a good steward or “husbandry” of one’s financial resources.

The overall message seems to be that to avoid potential interpersonal issues and remain fiscally prudent, it’s best to neither lend nor borrow money from friends or associates when possible. The quote conveys that involvement with monetary loans can negatively impact both social relationships and one’s money management habits.

#TalkLikeShakespeareDay April 23
Birthday April 23, 1564 – Died April 23, 1616

 

Shakespeare on Ethical Finance of War

Posted by admin on Saturday, October 11, 2014

William Shakespeare (Brutus to Cassius in Julius Ceasar, Act 4, Scene 3) Money Quote: Brutus opposed to funding war unethically would rather die and spend his blood. William Shakespeare said:
 
William Shakespeare For I can raise no money by vile means. By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas quote
 

“For I can raise no money by vile means. By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is expressing a strong preference through one of his characters. The character says they would rather “coin my heart” and shed their own blood to raise money, than resort to “vile means” or unethical/illegal activities to obtain funds.

The interpretation is that the character possesses a high degree of integrity and principle, stating they could not bring themselves to use dishonorable or corrupt practices to make money. Rather than compromise their morality, the character implies they would undergo physical hardship and injury.

The overall message seems to be of the importance Shakespeare places on upholding one’s principles even in the face of financial difficulties or need.

Shakespeare on Counterfeiting Coins

Posted by admin on Friday, August 16, 2013

Shakespeare Money Quotation saying in King Lear that Governments mint coins at will, while citizens would face steep penalties for that act. Shakespeare said:
 
No, they can’t accuse me of counterfeiting coins. I’m the king himself Quote
 

“No, they can’t accuse me of counterfeiting coins. I’m the king himself” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is having one of his characters, who is a king, make a statement about accusations of counterfeiting coins.

The interpretation is that as the king, he is essentially above the law and any criminal charges. As the monarch and ruler, he is the highest legal authority, so cannot be prosecuted for any financial crimes like producing fake currency.

The underlying message seems to be that absolute power and position can place one beyond normal legal accountability for their actions. The king is implying that as the head of state, no one has jurisdiction to bring charges against him for counterfeiting, since he embodies the law itself as king.

Next Page »
Money Quotes Daily

Money Quotes Daily