Posts Tagged ‘silver’

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Willard Scott: Retirement Fund

Posted by admin on Saturday, September 4, 2021

Willard Scott Money Quote saying a quality marriage can be compared to a good investment in that it appreciates over time to peak in golden years. Willard Scott said:
 
retirement fund. You put everything you have into it during your productive life, and over the years it turns from silver to gold to platinum Quote
 

“A good marriage is like an incredible retirement fund. You put everything you have into it during your productive life, and over the years it turns from silver to gold to platinum” — Willard Scott

 

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In this quote, Willard Scott seems to be using the metaphor of a retirement fund to describe the evolution and rewards of a strong marriage over time. Specifically:

  • Scott portrays a good marriage as like making significant “deposits” into a retirement account through the investments of love, commitment, sacrifice and effort one makes while in their “productive” working years of life.
  • He notes that just as investments gain value over decades, a marriage deepens and its rewards become more apparent as the years pass (“turns from silver to gold to platinum”).
  • Scott implies that just as a retirement fund provides sustenance and security in older age, the emotional, social and practical support of a healthy marriage grows more invaluable as one reaches later stages of life.

The best interpretation is that Scott believes a marriage that stands the test of time becomes an increasingly precious resource, much like a retirement account that compounds in value the longer it accrues. His quote conveys the perspective that making “deposits” into a marriage through the active years ultimately pays profound lifelong dividends according to his metaphor for marriage’s capacity to enrich all seasons of life.

Adam Smith: Labor Wealth

Posted by admin on Saturday, January 9, 2021

Adam Smith Money Quote saying It was work that bought the world, not money or precious metals, but labor that bought the wealth of the world. Adam Smith said:
 
Labour was the first price, the original purchase - money that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all wealth of the world was originally purchased Quote
 

“Labour was the first price, the original purchasemoney that was paid for all things. It was not by gold or by silver, but by labour, that all wealth of the world was originally purchased” — Adam Smith

 

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In this quote, Adam Smith is discussing the origins and fundamental role of labor in the creation of wealth. He states that “labor was the first price, the original purchase-money” used to obtain all things of value in the world.

Smith is arguing that throughout history, it was not gold, silver or other currencies that were primarily used to acquire wealth, but rather human labor itself. People exchanged their labor and work as the original “payment” to produce useful goods, services and assets.

In essence, the quote establishes labor as the original and most basic form of payment that drove early economic transactions and allowed for the accumulation of wealth over time. Smith sees labor as the primary commodity exchanged by humans to fulfill their needs and desires, long before money was established. It reflects his view that labor is the ultimate source of all value in an economy.

Daniel Webster: Irredeemable Paper

Posted by admin on Wednesday, November 18, 2020

Daniel Webster Money Quote saying there are nothing by bankruptcies, cheating, lies and unkept promises with nothing but paper to show for the trouble. Daniel Webster said:
 
not gold nor silver; no sir, representing nothing but broken promises, bad faith, bankrupt corporations, cheated creditors and a ruined people Quote
 

“We are in danger of being overwhelmed with irredeemable paper, mere paper, representing not gold nor silver; no sir, representing nothing but broken promises, bad faith, bankrupt corporations, cheated creditors and a ruined people” — Daniel Webster

 

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In this quote, Daniel Webster is warning about the dangers of having too much paper currency, or “irredeemable paper”, in circulation without being backed by a commodity like gold or silver. By “irredeemable paper” he is referring to banknotes or promissory notes that are not redeemable for specie (gold or silver coins). Webster believed that having a currency made up solely of paper notes without commodity backing would lead to a loss of confidence in the value of money.

This in turn could lead to “broken promises” if banks could not redeem paper money for gold/silver as promised, “bad faith” if the paper currency was not trustworthy, “bankrupt corporations” as businesses struggled without a stable currency, “cheated creditors” who could not collect debts of known value, and ultimately a “ruined people” as the economy suffered from a lack of sound money.

In essence, Webster was warning of the dangers of fiat currency not tied to a commodity standard, and the economic and social problems that could arise from having “mere paper” as legal tender without real value behind it. He felt this could overwhelm and ruin the country’s financial system and prosperity.

Kahlil Gibran: Gold & Silver Dreams

Posted by admin on Sunday, November 8, 2020

Kahlil Gibran Money Quote saying that making everything about money is the lowest anyone can go. Kahlil Gibran said:
 
No lower can a man descend than to interpret his dreams into gold and silver Quote
 

“No lower can a man descend than to interpret his dreams into gold and silver” — Kahlil Gibran

 

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This quote from Kahlil Gibran seems to be criticizing the act of valuing one’s dreams solely based on their potential for material gain or wealth. By saying a man “cannot descend lower” than interpreting dreams into gold and silver, Gibran appears to be suggesting that reducing dreams to their monetary worth is a shallow or misguided way of thinking.

The quote portrays dreams as having deeper and less tangible value than just their ability to generate profit. Gibran could be arguing that dreams should be pursued for their own merit and what they mean to the individual, not simply because they might lead to riches.

Overall, the quote serves as a warning against an overly commercial or financially-focused mindset that fails to appreciate the intrinsic significance of dreams and aspirations.

Euripides: Gold Not the Only Coin

Posted by admin on Wednesday, November 4, 2020

Euripides Money Quote saying precious metals are not the only coin – virtue is seen as highly valuable everywhere. Euripides said:
 
Silver and gold are not the only coin; virtue too passes current all over the world Quote
 

“Silver and gold are not the only coin; virtue too passes current all over the world” — Euripides

 

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In this quote, Euripides is saying that while money or precious metals like silver and gold are commonly used as currency, virtue and good character also have significant value that is recognized universally.

The best interpretation is that Euripides believes moral qualities like integrity, kindness and wisdom hold worth just like financial assets, as these virtues can open doors and gain trust for a person anywhere in the world regardless of location or culture.

His point appears to be that reputation and ethics effectively function as a form of non-monetary “coin” that facilitates interactions and opportunities across societies in much the same way that money does.

Oscar Wilde: Gold Merchants Silver

Posted by admin on Friday, August 14, 2020

Oscar Wilde Money Quote saying religious figures value the soul at an infinitely higher rate than do business people. Oscar Wilde said:
 
How strange a thing this is! The Priest telleth me that the soul is worth all the gold in the world, and the merchants say that it is not worth a clipped piece of silver Quote
 

“How strange a thing this is! The Priest telleth me that the soul is worth all the gold in the world, and the merchants say that it is not worth a clipped piece of silver” — Oscar Wilde

 

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This Oscar Wilde quote reflects on the differing views of the soul’s value between religious figures and businessmen. The “Priest” sees the soul as infinitely precious, worth more than all the gold on earth. In contrast, the “merchants” view the soul in purely monetary terms, seeing it as worthless compared to even a small coin.

Wilde seems to be highlighting the irony that while priests preach the soul’s immeasurable worth, merchants consider it a commodity with little financial significance. The quote presents a critique of a profit-driven mindset that reduces human worth and spirituality to cold economic calculations rather than profound spiritual significance.

It conveys Wilde’s perspective that religious and commercial views of human value are often diametrically opposed.

Robert Kiyosaki: Gold & Silver

Posted by admin on Saturday, May 16, 2020

Robert Kiyosaki Money Quote saying the commodities market is above the fray and have more value than cash. Robert Kiyosaki said:
 
Commodities such as gold and silver have a world market that transcends national borders, politics, religions, and race. A person may not like someone else’s religion, but he’ll accept his gold Quote
 

“Commodities such as gold and silver have a world market that transcends national borders, politics, religions, and race. A person may not like someone else’s religion, but he’ll accept his gold” — Robert Kiyosaki

 

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In this quote, Robert Kiyosaki seems to be conveying the universal value and fungibility of commodities like gold and silver across diverse populations and circumstances. By stating they have a “world market that transcends national borders, politics, religions, and race”, and that while people may disagree on beliefs, “he’ll accept his gold”, Kiyosaki implies that precious metals maintain stable worth regardless of differences that can divide other aspects of society and commerce.

The quote portrays Kiyosaki’s perspective that gold and silver function as impartial, cross-cultural stores of value precisely because their valuation stems not from subjective affiliations but objective qualities like scarcity and industrial applications. Overall, Kiyosaki appears to be arguing that commodities’ intrinsic properties impart them a global liquidity that bridges social and ideological divides in a way no fiat currency or other assets can due to their apolitical, universal acceptance.

Norm Franz: Gold Money of Kings

Posted by admin on Thursday, March 14, 2019

Norm Franz Money Quote saying every class has attached themselves to a preferred method of payment, from excess to debt. Norm Franz said:
 
Gold is the money of kings; silver is the money of gentlemen; barter is the money of peasants; but debt is the money of slaves Quote
 

Gold is the money of kings; silver is the money of gentlemen; barter is the money of peasants; but debt is the money of slaves” — Norm Franz

 

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This quote from Norm Franz suggests different types of currencies throughout history have been associated with certain social classes or levels of independence. Some key points in interpreting his perspective:

  • Franz implies that while gold represented royal or noble status, and silver upper-middle class or landowning status, bartering or trade represented a more agrarian or peasant existence.
  • He portrays taking on debt (“debt is the money of slaves”) as relinquishing autonomy, with borrowers beholden to creditors in a manner akin to slavery through financial obligations.
  • However, reasonable experts also note that some debt, like low-interest student loans or mortgages, can enable important goals for some individuals if the terms are suitable and the debt is managed responsibly as part of a holistic financial strategy.
  • A balanced interpretation is that while reflecting Franz’s strong caution around debt obligations, prudent personal finance requires moderation – neither excessive debt nor a complete avoidance of debt optimize well-being for all, as circumstances and priorities vary significantly between individuals.

Overall, the quote conveys Franz’s belief that debt compromises independence. But the best analysis also considers counterarguments and recognizes that for some, limited, short-term debt can make sense in certain contexts if responsibly planned as part of a holistic approach, while others prioritize avoiding debt altogether according to their risk tolerance and needs over the lifetime. Multiple reasonable viewpoints exist in ongoing discussions of these complex topics.

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