Posts Tagged ‘seneca’

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Seneca: Slave to Greed

Posted by admin on Saturday, December 30, 2023

Meaning of Seneca Money Quote: saying men are often slaves to their internal drives, including greed and not free. Seneca said:

 
Show me a man who is not a slave to greed, and all men are slaves to fear Quote

 

“‘He is a slave’ But shall that stand in his way? Show me a man who is not a slave; one is a slave to lust, another to greed, another to ambition, and all men are slaves to fear” — Seneca

 

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Seneca is pointing out that true freedom is freedom from inner vices and emotions that control us, not just freedom from external forces. His quote suggests that while some may not be physically enslaved, all people are enslaved to certain desires, weaknesses and fears inside themselves.

No one is fully free from being a “slave” to lust, greed, ambition or fear according to Seneca. Therefore, even if one is not legally owned by another person, one can still be ruled by their base impulses and psychological drives rather than living according to reason.

Overall, Seneca argues that true liberation comes from having power and mastery over one’s own mind, not from escaping external bondage alone, since internal slavery to passions still leaves one not fully free.

Seneca: Fidelity Purchased Destroy

Posted by admin on Monday, April 17, 2023

Meaning of Seneca Money Quote: saying Faithfulness bought, can also be destroyed by other buyers. Seneca said:

 
Fidelity purchased with money, money can destroy Quote
 

“Fidelity purchased with money, money can destroy” — Seneca

 

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Seneca is cautioning that loyalty or fidelity that has been bought with money may not last. His quote suggests that if someone is paid to be faithful or loyal to another, then that financial arrangement could easily be undermined by offering more money.

Seneca implies that fidelity obtained through financial means, rather than genuine care or commitment, is fragile and can be “destroyed” by simply paying that person more than the original amount that secured their loyalty. In other words, trust and allegiance motivated primarily by money rather than character or conviction may prove fleeting if counter-incentives are introduced.

Overall, Seneca’s quote advises that fidelity is best built on intrinsic virtues like integrity rather than extrinsic factors like compensation that can compromise true devotion over time.

Seneca: Wasting Time Misers

Posted by admin on Thursday, January 12, 2023

Meaning of Seneca Money Quote: saying many waste their time, but are very miserly with belongings and cash. Seneca said:
 
property and money, yet think too little of wasting time, the one thing about which we should all be the toughest misers Quote
 

“We’re tight-fisted with property and money, yet think too little of wasting time, the one thing about which we should all be the toughest misers” — Seneca

 

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In this quote, Seneca is criticizing how people are often too careful and protective of their material possessions and wealth, yet too wasteful and careless with their time. He argues that while property and money can be replaced if lost, time is a resource that once spent cannot be regained.

Therefore, according to Seneca, we should all be very prudent and sparing with how we use our time each day, being mindful not to squander it on trivial or unproductive matters. The quote suggests we should adopt a “miserly” attitude when it comes to time in the sense of spending it only on worthwhile endeavors.

Overall, Seneca is advocating that people value their time more highly and guard against wasting it, as time is the one truly finite and non-renewable commodity we all possess.

Seneca: Acquisition of Wealth

Posted by admin on Tuesday, February 8, 2022

Seneca the Younger Money Quote saying that when wealth is acquired it fails to eliminate trouble, but makes trouble different. Seneca the Younger said:
 
For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them Quote
 

“For many men, the acquisition of wealth does not end their troubles, it only changes them” — Seneca the Younger

 

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Seneca is suggesting that for some people, simply acquiring wealth or financial success does not necessarily solve all of their problems or make them truly happy. While gaining money may resolve certain issues or challenges, it can also create new types of troubles and stresses to deal with.

The nature of one’s problems may change once wealthy, but problems and difficulties do not altogether disappear. Seneca seems to be cautioning that attaining wealth alone is not a panacea and does not guarantee an end to life’s difficulties or an overall sense of contentment and fulfillment.

Seneca: Riches Shut Off From Wisdom

Posted by admin on Saturday, July 14, 2018

Seneca Money Quote saying wealth prevents the gaining of wisdom for many; poverty is not weighed-down with worries about protecting their possessions when a fire threatens. Seneca said:
 
Riches shut off wisdom; poverty is unburdened and free from care Quote
 

Riches have shut off many a man from the attainment of wisdom; poverty is unburdened and free from care. When the trumpet sounds, the poor man knows that he is not being attacked; when there is a cry of ‘Fire,’ he only seeks a way of escape, and does not ask what he can save” — Seneca

 

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In this quote, Seneca suggests that wealth can sometimes be an obstacle to gaining wisdom, while poverty allows for a freer and less burdened state of mind.

He says that the poor man does not have to worry about defending his possessions when danger arises, like in a battle signaled by a trumpet sound. Similarly, if there is a cry of “Fire,” the poor man’s only concern is escape and not what valuables can be saved.

Seneca seems to be saying that poverty removes certain cares and distractions that can come with protecting and maintaining wealth, leaving one unburdened to potentially attain greater wisdom and understanding of life.

Seneca: Crime Committed by Profits

Posted by admin on Friday, July 13, 2018

Seneca Money Quote saying that those that benefit from criminal acts have as good as committed them. Seneca said:
 
He has committed the crime who profits by it Quote
 

“He has committed the crime who profits by it” — Seneca

 

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In this quote, Seneca appears to be saying that a person should not be considered solely responsible for committing a criminal act if another has benefited or profited from the crime. Anyone who gains advantage from an illegal or unethical deed could also be seen as complicit, even if they did not directly perpetrate the act itself.

Seneca seems to be suggesting that profiting from wrongdoing can make one as culpable as the one who directly carried out the criminal plans or actions. So according to this interpretation, Seneca believes that both the perpetrator and the beneficiary are responsible in some way for the “crime.”

Seneca: Wise Man’s Riches

Posted by admin on Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Seneca Money Quote saying it’s possible to be happy without riches, even when possessed and lost – because wisdom values the moment. Seneca said:
 
Riches are slaves in the house of a wise man, but masters in that of a fool. […] If one takes away riches from the wise man, one leaves him still in possession of all that is his Quote
 

“Riches are slaves in the house of a wise man, but masters in that of a fool. […] If one takes away riches from the wise man, one leaves him still in possession of all that is his: for he lives happy in the present, and without fear for the future” — Seneca

 

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In this quote, Seneca is contrasting how the wise man and the fool view and relate to riches or wealth. He suggests that for the wise man, riches are “slaves” – they are possessions that he commands and does not let command him. The wise man does not depend on or define himself by his wealth.

However, for the fool, riches are the “masters” – the fool is ruled by and finds his identity and sense of purpose in the money and possessions he has accumulated. Seneca further says that if you take away the wise man’s riches, he remains content and happy because he lives in the present and is not afraid of an uncertain future. He does not rely on wealth for his well-being or sense of self.

Seneca: Poverty a Burden & Wealth Also

Posted by admin on Saturday, March 12, 2016

Seneca Money Quote saying it is our approach to thinking of having or not having that determines the effect on our lives. Seneca said:
 
For the fault is not in the wealth, but in the mind itself. That which had made poverty a burden to us, has made riches also a burden Quote
 

“For the fault is not in the wealth, but in the mind itself. That which had made poverty a burden to us, has made riches also a burden” — Seneca

 

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In this quote, Seneca is saying that the problems associated with wealth or poverty do not stem from the actual circumstances themselves, but rather from one’s own mindset and attitude. It is not wealth or poverty alone that causes difficulties, but rather how one thinks about and relates to their financial situation.

Seneca suggests that the same mental flaws or weaknesses that make poverty burdensome – such as greed, desire, or lack of contentment – will also be present when one gains riches. Therefore, the underlying problem lies not in external conditions of wealth or poverty, but in one’s internal mind and way of perceiving the world.

According to Seneca, it is our own thinking and perspective that can turn both poverty and riches into burdens.

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