Posts Tagged ‘ralph waldo emerson’

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Ralph Waldo Emerson: God Billed

Posted by admin on Wednesday, August 2, 2023

Meaning of Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote: saying treat debt as though it is owed to god. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:

  
Pay every debt, as if God wrote the bill Quote
 

Pay every debt, as if God wrote the bill” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, philosopher and essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be emphasizing the importance of fulfilling one’s financial obligations responsibly and dutifully. By stating that one should “pay every debt, as if God wrote the bill”, Emerson implies that debts should be treated as sacred duties rather than mere financial liabilities.

The quote conveys Emerson’s view that meeting one’s monetary commitments is a moral imperative that warrants as much care, attention and respect as if the demands came directly from a higher authority.

Overall, Emerson appears to be advocating an ethical approach to debt repayment, one grounded in principles of integrity, accountability and honoring one’s pledged word rather than basing decisions solely on monetary considerations.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Spend Skills

Posted by admin on Saturday, March 19, 2022

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying money is worthless, until it is spent and how that spending happens matters. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
  
Money is of no value; it cannot spend itself. All depends on the skill of the spender Quote
 

Money is of no value; it cannot spend itself. All depends on the skill of the spender” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

  

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be making two key points about money:

  1. That money itself has no inherent worth and is useless if not put to practical use, as it cannot “spend itself” without human action and decision-making.
  2. That how well money is utilized depends entirely on the abilities and judgment of the person choosing to spend it. Emerson refers to this as the “skill of the spender.”

Overall, Emerson appears to be arguing that financial resources only gain value and purpose when deployed effectively by knowledgeable and prudent spenders. The quote conveys Emerson’s view that money’s utility relies entirely on the spending skills, wisdom and resourcefulness of the individuals allocating and applying funds, not on the money itself. It emphasizes the active, thoughtful role of spenders in determining money’s real impact and value.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Feeling Poor

Posted by admin on Saturday, November 28, 2020

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying you become what you believe you are – rich or poor. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Poverty consists in feeling poor Quote
 

Poverty consists in feeling poor” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be suggesting that true poverty is defined more by one’s state of mind than merely their financial circumstances. By stating that “poverty consists in feeling poor”, Emerson appears to be arguing that a sense of lack, inadequacy or deprivation is what constitutes real poverty rather than objective economic metrics alone.

The quote implies that one can feel impoverished even with modest means if their outlook is dominated by perceptions of insufficiency. Overall, Emerson conveys his view that poverty involves more than material conditions – it is an internalized psychological experience of lack that can afflict those with wealth too if their mindset is defined by scarcity rather than abundance.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Rich Heart

Posted by admin on Sunday, August 9, 2020

Meaning of Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote: saying wealth of character shines, but with lack of healthy character, riches can become real ugly. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Without a rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar Quote
 

“Without a rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be suggesting that possessing wealth alone is meaningless or even undesirable without also having an inner richness of spirit and character. By stating that without a “rich heart,” wealth turns one into an “ugly beggar,” Emerson appears to be arguing that financial resources are unattractive and unbecoming if the individual is lacking in deeper qualities like compassion, wisdom, integrity and generosity.

The quote implies true riches originate from inner strength and depth of feeling, and that outer wealth rings hollow without an accompanying inner wealth of virtues and principles. Overall, Emerson conveys his view that money and possessions mean little and may even degrade one’s spirit if not paired with an internally “rich heart.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Commodity

Posted by admin on Monday, August 3, 2020

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying money can be represented by products we all need in some form. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Money is the representative of a certain quantity of corn or other commodity. It is so much warmth, so much bread Quote
 

Money is the representative of a certain quantity of corn or other commodity. It is so much warmth, so much bread” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be characterizing money as a symbolic stand-in for real commodities that have practical utility. By stating that money represents “a certain quantity of corn or other commodity”, and that it equates to tangible goods like “so much warmth, so much bread”, Emerson appears to be arguing that money derives its value from what it can be exchanged for in terms of necessities and provisions.

The quote conveys Emerson’s view that money is essentially a token allowing one to obtain goods and services essential for survival and well-being, like food and heat. Overall, Emerson portrays money as a medium of exchange rather than something intrinsically valuable – it serves as a token to acquire real resources that sustain life.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Solvent Debt

Posted by admin on Wednesday, July 29, 2020

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying it’s easy to rationalize national debt based on the idea that Uncle Sam is good for it. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Solvency is maintained by means of a national debt, on the principle, If you will not lend me the money, how can I pay you? Quote
 

“Solvency is maintained by means of a national debt, on the principle, If you will not lend me the money, how can I pay you?” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be satirically commenting on the concept of national debt. By stating that solvency is maintained through debt “on the principle” of if you won’t lend money how can it be repaid, Emerson appears to be using irony to highlight the somewhat circular logic around government borrowing.

The quote implies that debt obligations are perpetuated by the need to take on more debt to meet prior debt commitments. Overall, Emerson’s tone suggests he is poking fun at how national financing relies on constant refinancing of existing liabilities, with new loans effectively “paying” old ones rather than truly resolving financial obligations. The dry wit points to Emerson viewing this mechanism with some skepticism or criticism.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: $ Costs Too Much

Posted by admin on Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying what is given in exchange for money is often worth more than the cash and might not be a good deal. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Money often costs too much Quote
 

“Money often costs too much” ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be suggesting that money can sometimes come at too high a price or cost relative to its value. By stating that money “often costs too much”, Emerson appears to be arguing that pursuing wealth sometimes demands sacrifices or compromises that exceed the worth of the financial gains.

The quote implies that the means through which money is obtained or the negative consequences it leads to in some cases make the monetary rewards not worthwhile. Overall, Emerson conveys the view that while money has utility, people should be discerning about whether acquiring it in a particular situation is worth the personal or moral “costs” incurred to do so. The benefits of wealth may not always outweigh the costs of obtaining it.

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Foolish Philanthropist

Posted by admin on Saturday, November 18, 2017

Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote saying some begrudge the call to help the poor when they don’t know them or their community and so give reluctantly. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Are they my poor? Thou Foolish Philanthropist, I grudge the dollar Quote
 

“Do not tell me of my obligation to put all poor men in good situations. Are they my poor? I tell thee, thou foolish philanthropist, that I grudge the dollar, the dime, the cent, I give to such men as do not belong to me and to whom I do not belong” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

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In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be criticizing a notion of unconditional charity towards all people in need. By stating he “grudges” money given to “poor men” who are not his own and to whom he does not belong, Emerson appears to be arguing against an open-ended obligation to assist any and all individuals simply due to their impoverished state.

The quote conveys Emerson’s view that philanthropic responsibility is bounded within closer community ties and relationships, rather than extending to all humanity in an abstract sense. Overall, Emerson seems to be advocating for a more selective, discriminating approach to charity based on personal connections and associations, rather than an unqualified duty to aid all poor people everywhere without distinction.

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