Posts Tagged ‘frederick douglass’

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Frederick Douglass: Run in Debt

Posted by admin on Tuesday, June 20, 2023

Meaning of Frederick Douglass Money Quote: saying believing it’s wise to be wary of being in debt. Frederick Douglass said:

 
I had a wholesome dread of the consequences of running in debt Quote
 

“I had a wholesome dread of the consequences of running in debt” — Frederick Douglass

 

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This quote suggests that Frederick Douglass had a strong aversion to taking on debt and the financial obligations that come with it. He implies that he had a “wholesome dread” or healthy fear of the potential consequences and burdens associated with borrowing money and going into debt.

The quote highlights Douglass’ understanding that debt carries ongoing responsibilities and costs that must be managed carefully. His word choice shows he viewed living within one’s means as preferable to taking on the risks and stresses of owing money to others.

Frederick Douglass: Get, Certainly Pay for All

Posted by admin on Friday, November 10, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying there is no escaping paying for everything, but we must also look to get full value for that spent. Frederick Douglass said:
 
Men may not get all they pay for in the world, but they must certainly pay for all they get quote
 
“Men may not get all they pay for in this world, but they must certainly pay for all they get” — Frederick Douglass
 

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This quote from Frederick Douglass suggests that in life, one does not always receive full value in direct proportion to what they spend or pay. However, he implies that people will inevitably face consequences or costs associated with anything they obtain or benefit from.

The quote highlights Douglass’ view that while spending money does not guarantee commensurate returns, one cannot truly get something for nothing – there is always a price to pay in some form for every advantage or privilege acquired.

It conveys his perspective that in this world, people must accept responsibility and accountability for both the financial and non-financial costs of their actions and gains.

Birthday February 14, 1818 – Died February 20, 1895

 

Frederick Douglass: We Cheap Americans

Posted by admin on Monday, July 17, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying wealth that can be had cheap will always be found by Americans to gain further wealth. Frederick Douglass said:
 
It is a fact, that whatever makes for the wealth or for the reputation of Americans and can be had cheap will be found by Americans Quote
 

“It is a fact, that whatever makes for the wealth or for the reputation of Americans and can be had cheap will be found by Americans” — Frederick Douglass

 

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This quote from Frederick Douglass suggests that Americans are driven to pursue anything that can increase their wealth or reputation, as long as it can be obtained inexpensively. He implies that opportunities for financial or social gain, even if they are of questionable quality or merit, will often be attractive to Americans if the cost is low.

The quote highlights Douglass’ observation that pragmatism and cost-effectiveness can sometimes outweigh other considerations for Americans when it comes to accumulating riches or enhancing their public image. It conveys his view that Americans have a tendency to capitalize on affordable options for bolstering their prosperity or renown.

Frederick Douglass: Slavery Money Making

Posted by admin on Sunday, July 16, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying the American slave-trade in the 1850’s was continued by some entirely due to profit motive and regardless of human suffering it caused. Frederick Douglass said:
 
Money is the measure of morality, and the success or failure of slavery, as a money-making system, determines with many whether the thing is virtuous, or villainous, and whether it should be maintained or abolished Quote
 

“Money is the measure of morality, and the success or failure of slavery, as a money-making system, determines with many whether the thing is virtuous, or villainous, and whether it should be maintained or abolished” — Frederick Douglass

 

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criticizing the view that the morality of slavery was determined primarily by whether it was financially profitable or “a money-making system.” By pointing out that many people judged slavery based on “whether the thing is virtuous, or villainous” depending on its economic success or failure, Douglass appears to be arguing that the humanity and basic rights of enslaved people were being ignored or treated as secondary to financial interests.

His quote suggests that the abolitionist cause needed to make the moral argument that slavery was an evil institution regardless of any money it produced, and that people’s worth should not be measured merely by their economic value.

Frederick Douglass: No God But Wealth

Posted by admin on Saturday, July 15, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote from an 1857 speech reflecting on how slave-holders and profiteers would respond to John the Disciple dismissing angelic visits from God to discuss wealth. Frederick Douglass said:
 
How will it affect property? In the eyes of such people, there is no God but wealth; no right and wrong but profit and loss Quote
 

“But brother John, will it pay? Can money be made out of it? Will it make the rich richer, and the strong stronger? How will it affect property? In the eyes of such people, there is no God but wealth; no right and wrong but profit and loss” — Frederick Douglass

 

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In this quote, Frederick Douglass is criticizing a perspective that only values wealth accumulation and prioritizes financial gain above all else.

He implies that some people see wealth as the sole measure of worth or “God” and judge all things based on whether they can increase property and profits rather than considerations of morality.

The quote suggests these individuals would only support an idea or action if it further enriched the rich and powerful, with no regard for justice, equality or ethics.

Douglass is highlighting how a singular focus on money above other principles can lead people to condone or condemn things solely on their potential financial impacts rather than rightness or wrongness.

Frederick Douglass: Rich Tyrants vs. Slaves

Posted by admin on Friday, July 14, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying in 1852 that religion turned a blind eye to rich slave owners and encouraged slavery and oppression of the poor. Frederick Douglass said:
 
A religion which favors the rich against the poor; which exalts the proud above the humble; which divides mankind into two classes, tyrants and slaves Quote
 

“A religion which favors the rich against the poor; which exalts the proud above the humble; which divides mankind into two classes, tyrants and slaves; which says to the man in chains, stay there; and to the oppressor, oppress on; it is a religion which may be professed and enjoyed by all the robbers and enslavers of mankind” — Frederick Douglass

 

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In this quote, Frederick Douglass is strongly criticizing a religion or ideology that favors the privileged and powerful over the disadvantaged.

He suggests it divides society into oppressors and oppressed, telling the poor and enslaved they must accept their condition while telling the rich and proud they can continue to exploit others.

Douglass implies this is an unjust system that allows those who rob and enslave humanity to still profess and benefit from the religion.

The quote highlights Douglass’ view that any faith tradition that sanctions inequality and oppression by condoning the actions of tyrants while blaming the oppressed serves only to perpetuate injustice and is not a true religion of moral righteousness.

Frederick Douglass: Judge Gets 10 Dollars

Posted by admin on Thursday, July 13, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying Fugitive Slave Law in mid 19th Century made it profitable for judges to decide against slaves and for owners. Frederick Douglass said:
 
The Fugitive Slave Law makes mercy to them a crime; and bribes the judge who tries them. An American judge gets ten dollars consigns to slavery Quote
 

“The Fugitive Slave Law makes mercy to them a crime; and bribes the judge who tries them. An American judge gets ten dollars for every victim he consigns to slavery, and five, when he fails to do so” — Frederick Douglass

 

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In this quote, Frederick Douglass is strongly criticizing the Fugitive Slave Law and its unjust provisions. He suggests it perverted the justice system by incentivizing judges financially to rule in favor of slave owners claiming fugitive slaves.

Douglass implies the law effectively bribed judges to rule against escaped slaves by paying them $10 for each person returned to slavery, but only $5 if the claim of the slave owner was denied.

The quote highlights Douglass’ view that this perverted the concept of a fair trial, as judges had a monetary stake in the slave owner’s interests over showing mercy to fugitive slaves. He saw it as a corrupt system that made an impartial hearing denied to escaped slaves seeking freedom.

Frederick Douglass: Buyers & Sellers of Men

Posted by admin on Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Frederick Douglass Money Quote saying in his July 5th, 1852 speech to the Rochester Ladies Antislavery Society that evil men sold slaves like animals in the Northern U.S where slavery was outlawed.https://itsamoneything.com/money/frederick-douglass-buyers-sellers-men/ Frederick Douglass said:
 
caprice and rapacity of the buyers and sellers of men. My soul sickens at the sight Quote
 

“I hear the doleful wail of fettered humanity on the way to the slave-markets, where the victims are to be sold like horses, sheep, and swine, knocked off to the highest bidder. There I see the tenderest ties ruthlessly broken, to gratify the lust, caprice and rapacity of the buyers and sellers of men. My soul sickens at the sight” — Frederick Douglass

 

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In this quote, Frederick Douglass is vividly describing the horrors of the slave trade from his perspective. He speaks of hearing the “doleful wail” or cries of anguish from enslaved people being forcefully taken away in chains and transported to “slave-markets”. There, human beings would be treated as commodities and “sold like horses, sheep, and swine” to whoever offered the highest price through an auction.

Douglass emphasizes how deeply traumatic this was, as the “tenderest ties” or closest familial bonds were “ruthlessly broken” without regard for the people involved. All of this was done to satisfy the “lust, caprice and rapacity” or greedy, cruel and exploitative desires of those buying and profiting off the slave trade.

Douglass expresses his deep personal revulsion and sickness at witnessing the inhumane system of people being reduced to property and sold without mercy for the benefit of slave traders.

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