Posts Tagged ‘Colette’

Colette: Hope Costs Nothing

Posted by admin on Sunday, September 17, 2023

Meaning of Colette Money Quote: saying Hope has zero costs Maning there is no expense to worry about, nothing. Colette said:

 
Hope Costs Nothing Quote
 

“Hope costs nothing” — Colette

 

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This quote from Colette suggests that maintaining hope or optimism comes at no financial price. Some key points in interpreting her perspective:

  • Colette implies that having hope or wishing for better outcomes in life is an emotional or mental state that requires no tangible resources to sustain.
  • She portrays hope as a free asset that can be retained even when facing challenges or difficulties, unlike most material possessions.
  • However, excessive or unrealistic hope could potentially undermine prudent planning if not balanced with objective assessment of circumstances.
  • A balanced interpretation is that while hope alone demands no payment, bringing hope to fruition may involve costs that hope alone cannot surmount without additional effort or aid.

Overall, the quote reflects Colette’s viewpoint that retaining hope as a psychological coping mechanism bears no direct expenses. But the best analysis also considers that hope functioning productively in the world, like all virtues, relies on a combination of aspiration and pragmatic action according to one’s means and situation. Both perspectives have value in discussions around navigating life’s hardships and opportunities.

Birthday: 28 January 1873 – Death: 3 August 1954

Colette: Twin Deities Love, Money

Posted by admin on Monday, January 28, 2019

Colette Money Quote saying in relaxed conversation the fraternal twin sibling gods Love & Money always return. Colette said:
 
These leisurely conversations always revealed their worship of the same twin deities - love and money, and would drift away from money and love to come back Quote
 

“These leisurely conversations always revealed their worship of the same twin deities – love and money, and would drift away from money and love to come back” — Colette

 

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Nobel Prize for literature nominated, 1948 – Birthday January 28, 1873 – Died August 3, 1954

In this quote, Colette is commenting on the nature of leisurely conversations, which she observes tend to revolve around two dominant topics – love and money. However, she notes that while discussions may drift temporarily to other subjects, they inevitably come back to focusing on these twin interests of love and money.

Colette portrays love and money as almost deity-like or worshipped subjects that people are strongly drawn to discuss when relaxing and socializing freely. The quote conveys how conversations naturally and repeatedly gravitate towards these universal human preoccupations involving intimate relationships and financial matters.

Overall, Colette seems to be acknowledging how discussions tend to be framed around our deepest motivations connected to romantic affection and economic security/prosperity. Love and money surface again and again as core concerns that captivate us, even as conversations explore an array of related or tangential topics along the way.

Sidonie Gabrielle: Poverty in Lack of Reading

Posted by admin on Monday, November 1, 2010

Sidonie Gabrielle Money Quotation saying that true poverty is not just lack of funds, but lack of reading material to enrich our minds. Sidonie Gabrielle said:
 
Real poverty is a lack of books Quote
 

“Real poverty is lack of books” — Sidonie Gabrielle

 

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The quote “Real poverty is lack of books” by Sidonie Gabrielle suggests that true poverty is not just a lack of material wealth or money, but a lack of access to knowledge and information. By emphasizing “books” in particular, the quote implies that being deprived of literature, stories, and the ability to learn from what others have written is its own form of impoverishment.

The quote champions the value of education and ideas that can be gained from reading. It conveys that being able to freely explore one’s intellect and imagination through books is more important than mere physical possessions. Overall, the quote defines poverty in a more philosophical sense, prioritizing intellectual enrichment over financial wealth alone.

Birthday: 28 January 1873 – Death: 3 August 1954

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