Posts Tagged ‘christmas’

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Louisa May Alcott: Christmas Gifts

Posted by admin on Monday, December 21, 2020

Louisa May Alcott Money Quote saying it just isn’t what we expect of Christmas if there are no gifts. Louisa May Alcott said:
 
Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents Quote
 

“Christmas won’t be Christmas without any presents” — Louisa May Alcott

 

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The quote is from Louisa May Alcott’s novel “Little Women”. In the story, one of the main characters Jo March says this line to express how receiving gifts on Christmas is an important and expected part of celebrating the holiday.

The quote suggests that without presents, the spirit and joy of Christmas would be missing. Louisa May Alcott used this line to convey the idea that gift-giving is a tradition central to the experience of Christmas for many people and families.

Birthday: November 29, 1832 – Death: March 6, 1888

Melanie White: Magic Money Disappears

Posted by admin on Sunday, December 25, 2016

Melanie White Money Quote saying nothing is as much like magic as the poof of disappearing cash at Christmas time. Melanie White said:
 
There’s something about Christmas that’s magical. Money just seems to disappear into thin air Quote
 

“There’s something about Christmas that’s magical. Money just seems to disappear into thin air” — Melanie White

 

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In this quote, Melanie White seems to be commenting humorously on a common experience around the Christmas holiday season – that money has a way of mysteriously evaporating even as expenses pile up. By saying money “disappears into thin air”, White suggests that around Christmas, funds seem to vanish without a clear explanation.

This likely reflects the many small and large costs associated with the season – gifts, decorations, food, travel – that can deplete bank accounts quickly without much notice.

Overall, White appears to be wryly acknowledging in a lighthearted way how the festive spirit of Christmas often comes with a sizeable price tag, so that money circulates freely to spread joy even if it leaves one’s wallet much lighter.

Henry David Thoreau: Spend Christmas Well

Posted by admin on Friday, December 25, 2015

Henry David Thoreau Money Quotation saying what you do for Christmas matters more than the total spent on gifts. Henry David Thoreau said:
 
The way you spend Christmas is far more important than how much Quote
 

“The way you spend Christmas is far more important than how much” — Henry David Thoreau

 

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Henry David Thoreau is saying that how one spends and celebrates Christmas is more important than the total monetary amount spent on gifts or other material aspects of the holiday.

Thoreau emphasizes that the quality of experiences shared with family and friends, acts of goodwill, spiritual reflection, and time spent together are more meaningful aspects of Christmas than the dollar value of gifts or other purchases.

The quote suggests that the heartfelt way we observe Christmas matters more than the quantity of money or possessions involved.

Birthday: July 12, 1817 – Death: May 6, 1862

Charles Dickens: Scrooge Counting Christmas

Posted by admin on Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Charles Dickens Money Quotation saying in ‘A Christmas Carol’ that Ebenezer Scrooge had chosen one of the best days of the year to toil away counting pennies at Christmas time. Charles Dickens said:
 
Once upon a time - of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve - old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house Quote
 

“Once upon a time – of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve – old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house” — Charles Dickens

 

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Charles Dickens quote about Scrooge counting money at Christmas is: “Once upon a time – of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve – old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house.”

In this famous opening line from A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens is setting the scene and introducing the character Ebenezer Scrooge. The best interpretation is:

  • Dickens is contrasting the busyness and focus on work of Scrooge on Christmas Eve with the usual festive and joyous spirit associated with that holiday.
  • That Scrooge would choose to be “busy in his counting-house” on Christmas Eve implies his lack of care for celebration, generosity or human warmth.
  • Dickens presents Scrooge as a miserly, cold-hearted character from the outset by having him immersed in business and money matters even on a night meant for family, charity and goodwill.

The overall message is one of social commentary – Dickens is establishing Scrooge as a symbol of the neglect of spiritual values in favor of profit, which he aims to transform through the Christmas visitations from the ghosts. Scrooge’s actions on Christmas Eve perfectly capture his character that Dickens seeks to reprove.

Birthday: February 7, 1812 – Death: June 9, 1870

Larry Wilde: Running Out of Friends $

Posted by admin on Sunday, December 21, 2014

Larry Wilde Money Quotation saying Christmas gifting causes us to value our friends to decide which doesn’t receive gifts. Larry Wilde said:
 
Christmas is the season when people run out of money before they run out of friends Quote
 

Christmas is the season when people run out of money before they run out of friends” — Larry Wilde

 

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Larry Wilde is commenting on how people tend to spend all of their money on Christmas gifts and festivities for friends and family before the holiday season is over. The implication is that the demand for gift-giving and socializing during Christmas often exceeds people’s budgets.

Wilde is suggesting that one will “run out” of money to spend on others due to overspending before all of their social engagements and obligations to friends have been fulfilled. The quote highlights how the financial pressures of Christmas can sometimes outweigh the number of social connections one has to celebrate with.

Laurie Halse Anderson: Admit Failure, Divide Money

Posted by admin on Friday, December 19, 2014

Laurie Halse Anderson Money Quotation saying we could have an alternative Christmas if we simply admit failure and divide the dough and split. Laurie Halse Anderson said:
 
It's a shame we just can't admit that we have failed at family living, sell the house, split up the money, and get on with our lives. Merry Christmas Quote
 

It’s a shame we just can’t admit that we have failed at family living, sell the house, split up the money, and get on with our lives. Merry Christmas” — Laurie Halse Anderson

 

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Laurie Halse Anderson is suggesting that instead of struggling through family problems at Christmas, it may be better to admit failure, sell your family home, split up any money from the sale, and move on with your separate lives. The quote is using a somewhat tongue-in-cheek tone to say that dealing with family issues can ruin the holidays, so it may be preferable to end the family living situation and divide assets instead of continuing to have problems.

Anderson suggests selling the family home and splitting up the money from the sale because she feels that continuing to live together in the family home if there are ongoing family problems will only lead to continued issues during holidays like Christmas. By selling the home and dividing the money, each family member could move on separately and avoid struggling through more family conflicts at Christmas.

Ebenezer Scrooge: Threatening Disinheritance

Posted by admin on Thursday, December 18, 2014

Money Quotation by Charles Dickens character Ebenezer Scrooge, in ‘A Christmas Carol’ annoyed, warned his cheerful nephew that he will not inherit the misers fortune. Ebenezer Scrooge said:
 
As for you, nephew, if you were in my will, I'd disinherit you! Quote
 

“As for you, nephew, if you were in my will, I’d disinherit you!” — Ebenezer Scrooge

 

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In this quote, Ebenezer Scrooge is threatening to disinherit his nephew. As the miserly character that Scrooge is, he does not appreciate his nephew’s cheerful and generous nature.

By saying he would disinherit his nephew, Scrooge is warning him that he will not leave any of his fortune to his nephew in his will if his nephew continues being so cheerful and not as miserly as Scrooge.

This quote captures Scrooge’s cold and threatening nature towards anyone who does not share his view of squeezing every penny. It shows he values money over family.

Ebenezer Scrooge was a character created by Charles Dickens, who had a Birthday: February 7, 1812 – Death: June 9, 1870

Grace Kriley on Christmas Sales Shopping

Posted by admin on Wednesday, December 25, 2013

Grace Kriley Money Quotation saying spending our money so aggressively in December makes it easier when buying from store that bought too much. Grace Kriley said:
 
One good thing about Christmas shopping it toughens you for the January sales Quote
 

“One good thing about Christmas shopping it toughens you for the January sales” — Grace Kriley

 

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In this quote, Grace Kriley is drawing a comparison between Christmas shopping and sales shopping in January. She suggests that navigating the busy crowds and competitive nature of buying gifts in December helps to mentally and emotionally prepare a person for the even more intense shopping environment of post-holiday sales in January.

The quote portrays January sales as an even more cutthroat experience, with deeper discounts but higher demand and crowds. Kriley implies that if one can handle the hustle of Christmas shopping, then taking on the January sales will feel less daunting, as the holiday season shopping has effectively “toughened” them for what’s to come in the new year.

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