Posts Tagged ‘charles dickens’

Charles Dickens: Melted Into Dollars

Posted by admin on Friday, March 25, 2022

Charles Dickens Money Quote saying people turn everything they care about into money or financialize their cares. Charles Dickens said:
 
weighed by their dollars, measures gauged by their dollars; life was auctioneered, appraised, put up, and knocked down for its dollars Quote

“All their cares, hopes, joys, affections, virtues, and associations, seemed to be melted down into dollars. Whatever the chance contributions that fell into the slow cauldron of their talk, they made the gruel thick and slab with dollars. Men were weighed by their dollars, measures gauged by their dollars; life was auctioneered, appraised, put up, and knocked down for its dollars” — Charles Dickens

 

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In this quote, Charles Dickens is criticizing the prioritization of money above all else in society. The best interpretation is:

  • Dickens saw that people had reduced all aspects of life – cares, hopes, loves, virtues, relationships – and boiled them down primarily to their monetary worth or value in “dollars.”
  • In conversations too, the topic that most thickened and saturated any discussion was dollars, as people viewed and assessed everything through a financial lens.
  • He observed how people judged one another based on their net worth, and how life itself had become treated almost like a commodity to be bought and sold in a marketplace for its economic value alone in terms of “dollars.”

The overall message is one of social commentary – Dickens was denouncing the obsession with wealth and materialism as corrupting because it made people lose sight of deeper human qualities and experiences that can’t truly be quantified or replaced by money.

Charles Dickens: Purchase Civility

Posted by admin on Monday, February 3, 2020

Charles Dickens Money Quote saying that being civil to those without money is rare because they can’t purchase it. Charles Dickens said:
 
The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none Quote
 

“The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none” — Charles Dickens

 

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In this quote, Charles Dickens is commenting on how those without money or wealth are often denied politeness, respect and courtesy extended to people who can afford to pay.

The best interpretation is that Dickens believed there is a level of decorum and niceness that money alone can seemingly procure, but that the impoverished rarely experience the same civility or consideration. He saw a lack of basic human kindness shown towards those who have no money to their name.

The overall message is one of social criticism – that Dickens viewed true compassion and good manners as things everyone deserves, not commodities reserved only for those who can purchase superficial politeness through their purchasing power.

Charles Dickens: Credit Guarantors Paying

Posted by admin on Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Charles Dickens Money Quote saying that vouching for a debtor who promises to repay credit, is meaningless to the credit guarantor. Charles Dickens said:
 
[Credit is a system whereby] a person who can't pay, gets another person who can't pay, to guarantee that he can pay Quote
 

“[Credit is a system whereby] a person who can’t pay, gets another person who can’t pay, to guarantee that he can pay” — Charles Dickens

 

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In this quote, Charles Dickens is satirizing the concept of credit and how the credit system worked at the time. The best interpretation is:

  • Dickens observed that within the credit system, someone who cannot afford to pay off a debt themselves is able to take out a loan or line of credit.
  • However, this is only possible because another person who also lacks real means of payment acts as a guarantor or co-signer for the loan.
  • Essentially, Dickens saw that the credit system was based on those without money vouching for each other’s ability to pay, even though none of them truly have the financial ability or assets to back these transactions.
  • He viewed it as an illogical system that relied on empty promises from people who were not creditworthy themselves in order to function.

The overall message is Dickens’ criticism of how the credit industry operated, facilitating debt for both borrowers and guarantors who were all ultimately unable to satisfy repayment of these loans and obligations.

Charles Dickens: Scrooge Counting Christmas

Posted by admin on Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Charles Dickens Money Quotation saying in ‘A Christmas Carol’ that Ebenezer Scrooge had chosen one of the best days of the year to toil away counting pennies at Christmas time. Charles Dickens said:
 
Once upon a time - of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve - old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house Quote
 

“Once upon a time – of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve – old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house” — Charles Dickens

 

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Charles Dickens quote about Scrooge counting money at Christmas is: “Once upon a time – of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve – old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house.”

In this famous opening line from A Christmas Carol, Charles Dickens is setting the scene and introducing the character Ebenezer Scrooge. The best interpretation is:

  • Dickens is contrasting the busyness and focus on work of Scrooge on Christmas Eve with the usual festive and joyous spirit associated with that holiday.
  • That Scrooge would choose to be “busy in his counting-house” on Christmas Eve implies his lack of care for celebration, generosity or human warmth.
  • Dickens presents Scrooge as a miserly, cold-hearted character from the outset by having him immersed in business and money matters even on a night meant for family, charity and goodwill.

The overall message is one of social commentary – Dickens is establishing Scrooge as a symbol of the neglect of spiritual values in favor of profit, which he aims to transform through the Christmas visitations from the ghosts. Scrooge’s actions on Christmas Eve perfectly capture his character that Dickens seeks to reprove.

Ebenezer Scrooge: Threatening Disinheritance

Posted by admin on Thursday, December 18, 2014

Money Quotation by Charles Dickens character Ebenezer Scrooge, in ‘A Christmas Carol’ annoyed, warned his cheerful nephew that he will not inherit the misers fortune. Ebenezer Scrooge said:
 
As for you, nephew, if you were in my will, I'd disinherit you! Quote
 

“As for you, nephew, if you were in my will, I’d disinherit you!” — Ebenezer Scrooge

 

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In this quote, Ebenezer Scrooge is threatening to disinherit his nephew. As the miserly character that Scrooge is, he does not appreciate his nephew’s cheerful and generous nature.

By saying he would disinherit his nephew, Scrooge is warning him that he will not leave any of his fortune to his nephew in his will if his nephew continues being so cheerful and not as miserly as Scrooge.

This quote captures Scrooge’s cold and threatening nature towards anyone who does not share his view of squeezing every penny. It shows he values money over family.

Charles Dickens on Buying Civility

Posted by admin on Friday, March 14, 2014

Charles Dickens Money Quotation saying most of us can be made agreeable by cash, but those who remain uncivil are not often offered that gain. Charles Dickens said:
 
The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none Quote
 

“The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none” — Charles Dickens

 

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In this quote, Charles Dickens is commenting on how those without money or wealth are often denied politeness, respect and courtesy extended to people who can afford to pay.

The best interpretation is that Dickens believed there is a level of decorum and niceness that money alone can seemingly procure, but that the impoverished rarely experience the same civility or consideration. He saw a lack of basic human kindness shown towards those who have no money to their name.

The overall message is one of social criticism – that Dickens viewed true compassion and good manners as things everyone deserves, not commodities reserved only for those who can purchase superficial politeness through their purchasing power.

Charles Dickens: Annual Income Emotions

Posted by admin on Thursday, November 11, 2010

Charles Dickens Money Quotation saying that if you spend less than you earn you’ll be happy, regardless of how much you earn. Dickens said:
 
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery Quote
 

“Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery” — Charles Dickens

 

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This quote by Charles Dickens is highlighting how even a small difference in income versus expenses can significantly impact one’s happiness. Specifically, it suggests that living within one’s means and keeping expenditures slightly below what one earns results in happiness. Meanwhile, spending more than what is brought in leads to misery.

The quote implies that financial prudence and avoiding debt are important for well-being, according to Dickens’ perspective. Overall, it emphasizes how living below one’s means financially can contribute positively to life satisfaction compared to the stress of overspending.

Money Quotes Daily

Money Quotes Daily