Posts Tagged ‘benjamin disraeli’

Benjamin Disraeli: Passions Resolve

Posted by admin on Monday, March 21, 2022

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quote saying everything ends up resolving into money at some point for those whose passions have power. Benjamin Disraeli said:
  
passions resolve themselves into money. Love, ambition, even poetry, end in this Quote
 

“As men advance in life, all passions resolve themselves into money. Love, ambition, even poetry, end in this” — Benjamin Disraeli

  

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In this quote, Benjamin Disraeli is suggesting that as people get older and more experienced in life, their motivations and interests tend to consolidate and focus on the pursuit of money above all else.

Specifically, Disraeli argues that even powerful human drives like love, ambition and creative pursuits eventually boil down to prioritizing the accumulation of wealth. Things that may have inspired passion earlier in life come to revolve around financial objectives in the later stages of living.

The best interpretation is that Disraeli believed as people age and take on more responsibilities, their priorities undergo a transformation where the goal of making and securing money becomes the dominant or overriding motivation that other personal aims progressively serve. From this perspective, the desire for riches is what most passions evolve into being directed toward in the later phases of life.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

Benjamin Disraeli: Wealth Elegance

Posted by admin on Thursday, November 26, 2020

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quote saying excess is not enough and too much won’t satisfy anyone. Benjamin Disraeli said:
 
Teach us that wealth is not elegance, that profusion is not magnificence, that splendor is not beauty Quote
 

Teach us that wealth is not elegance, that profusion is not magnificence, that splendor is not beauty” — Benjamin Disraeli

 

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In this quote, Benjamin Disraeli seems to be distinguishing true luxury and aesthetics from its superficial appearances that often stem from money alone. By stating that “wealth is not elegance”, “profusion is not magnificence”, and “splendor is not beauty”, Disraeli implies lavish displays of money do not necessarily equate to refined taste, quality or attractiveness.

The quote conveys Disraeli’s perspective that while financial means can facilitate access to finer things, elegance, magnificence and beauty derive from an appreciation of craftsmanship, balance and artistic vision beyond conspicuous consumption.

Overall, Disraeli appears to be advocating an understanding that true sophistication lies not in extravagant spending itself but rather how resources are judiciously applied to cultivate beauty, quality and grace through design.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

Benjamin Disraeli: Loses Gains

Posted by admin on Friday, October 30, 2020

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quote saying someone that loses money always learns something from the experience and then gains even more. Benjamin Disraeli said:
 
A man who loses his money, gains, at the least, experience, and sometimes, something better Quote
 

“A man who loses his money, gains, at the least, experience, and sometimes, something better” — Benjamin Disraeli

 

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In this quote, Benjamin Disraeli seems to be suggesting that financial losses can sometimes have unintended benefits. By stating that a man who loses money “gains, at the least, experience”, Disraeli implies the person will emerge wiser from having navigated difficult circumstances. His addition of “and sometimes, something better” conveys Disraeli’s perspective that setbacks may also unexpectedly lead to new opportunities or insights.

The quote portrays Disraeli’s view that while unfortunate, monetary difficulties need not be entirely regrettable, as people can gain valuable life lessons and potentially uncover unforeseen advantages through overcoming challenges posed by loss of wealth. Overall, he appears to be advocating seeing some potential upside to adversity, so that financial reversals are not the sole focus but rather part of one’s broader personal and intellectual growth.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

Benjamin Disraeli: Two Nations, Rich & Poor

Posted by admin on Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quote saying the differences between wealthy and impoverished are as great as those between distant countries and don’t share even a language. Benjamin Disraeli said:
 
Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other's habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets. The rich and the poor Quote
 

“Two nations between whom there is no intercourse and no sympathy; who are as ignorant of each other’s habits, thoughts, and feelings, as if they were dwellers in different zones, or inhabitants of different planets. The rich and the poor” — Benjamin Disraeli

 

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This quote by Benjamin Disraeli seems to be referring to the divide between the rich and the poor in society. Disraeli describes the rich and poor as “two nations” who have “no intercourse and no sympathy” with each other, as if they lived in “different zones, or inhabited different planets.”

He is highlighting how separated and disconnected the lives and experiences of the rich and poor are. The rich may be ignorant of how the poor live and struggle, just as the poor do not understand the world of the rich.

So the best interpretation is that Disraeli is drawing attention to the vast gulf and lack of understanding between the socioeconomic classes of the rich and poor in his time.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

Benjamin Disraeli on Greatest Riches

Posted by admin on Thursday, July 25, 2013

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quotation saying show others how rich they are and how they can share that wealth to give them a great gift. Benjamin Disraeli said:
 
The greatest good you can do for another is not just to share your riches but to reveal to him his own Quote
 

“The greatest good you can do for another is not just to share your riches but to reveal to him his own” — Benjamin Disraeli

 

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The best interpretation of this quote by Benjamin Disraeli is that the greatest kindness you can show to someone is not just to share your wealth with them, but to help them discover and recognize their own strengths, abilities, and value within themselves.

By revealing their own potential, you are giving them a far more valuable gift than just material wealth.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

Benjamin Disraeli: Fairness of Wealth

Posted by admin on Friday, December 14, 2012

Benjamin Disraeli Money Quote saying rarely do we agree who deserves their wealth or lack of it, but few debate whether they should be counted among those who belong in that inner circle. Benjamin Disraeli said:
 
As a general rule, nobody has money who ought to have it Quote
 

“As a general rule, nobody has money who ought to have it” — Benjamin Disraeli

 

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In this quote, Benjamin Disraeli is making an observation about the unequal distribution of wealth in society. His point is that in most cases, those who truly need and deserve financial resources due to their circumstances or efforts often lack sufficient money or means of support.

Disraeli implies that the people and communities most deserving of money according to moral standards like need, merit or hard work are frequently not the ones who actually possess significant wealth. The quote suggests there is a disconnect between who “ought to have” money based on fairness and who practically “has” money in reality.

Overall, Disraeli appears to be commenting on how the allocation of economic resources and money frequently diverges from principles of justice, with many deserving parties lacking adequate funds through no fault of their own.

Birthday: 21 December 21, 1804 – Death: April 19, 1881

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