Posts Tagged ‘beggar’

Ralph Waldo Emerson: Rich Heart

Posted by admin on Sunday, August 9, 2020

Meaning of Ralph Waldo Emerson Money Quote: saying wealth of character shines, but with lack of healthy character, riches can become real ugly. Ralph Waldo Emerson said:
 
Without a rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar Quote
 

“Without a rich heart, wealth is an ugly beggar” — Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Ralph Waldo Emerson Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, Ralph Waldo Emerson seems to be suggesting that possessing wealth alone is meaningless or even undesirable without also having an inner richness of spirit and character. By stating that without a “rich heart,” wealth turns one into an “ugly beggar,” Emerson appears to be arguing that financial resources are unattractive and unbecoming if the individual is lacking in deeper qualities like compassion, wisdom, integrity and generosity.

The quote implies true riches originate from inner strength and depth of feeling, and that outer wealth rings hollow without an accompanying inner wealth of virtues and principles. Overall, Emerson conveys his view that money and possessions mean little and may even degrade one’s spirit if not paired with an internally “rich heart.”

Birthday: May 25, 1803 – Death: April 27, 1882

Jacqueline Susann: Love Beggar

Posted by admin on Tuesday, August 20, 2019

Jacqueline Susann Money Quote saying love can only be given, not begged for or made in trade or wrangled with speech – only given freely. Jacqueline Susann said:
 
Love is something that must be given -- it can't be bought with words or pity, or even reason Quote
 

“Love shouldn’t make a beggar of one. I wouldn’t want love if I had to beg for it, to barter or qualify it. And I should despise it if anyone ever begged for my love. Love is something that must be given — it can’t be bought with words or pity, or even reason” — Jacqueline Susann

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Jacqueline Susann Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

According to the quote by Jacqueline Susann above, she believes that love should not make someone feel like a beggar. She says she would not want love if she had to beg for it or bargain for it through words or pity.

Susann feels that love is something that must be freely given, and not bought through words, pity, or reason. By saying she would despise love if anyone begged for her love, Susann means that love loses its meaning and value if it is not given freely between two people, but instead one person has to plead or bargain for the other’s love.

Mason Cooley: Literary Lies About Poverty

Posted by admin on Saturday, September 29, 2018

Mason Cooley Money Quote saying authors have made the poor into unlikely colorful and routinely cheerful characters. Mason Cooley said:
 
Literary tradition is full of lies about poverty — the jolly beggar, the poor but happy milkmaid Quote
 

“Literary tradition is full of lies about poverty — the jolly beggar, the poor but happy milkmaid, the wholesome diet of porridge, etc.” — Mason Cooley

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Mason Cooley Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, Mason Cooley seems to be criticizing how literature has often portrayed and romanticized poverty inaccurately. Some key points:

  • He notes that many works in “literary tradition” contain “lies about poverty”, meaning they do not provide realistic or truthful depictions.
  • Cooley gives examples like the “jolly beggar” trope, implying poverty is often shown as somehow enjoyable or even amusing in stories.
  • Similarly, the “poor but happy milkmaid” archetype suggests impoverishment can coexist with contentment, which Cooley doubts.
  • Even “the wholesome diet of porridge” is referenced as an unrealistic literary cliche about poverty, when in reality diets of the poor tend to be less nutritious

Overall, Cooley appears to believe much classic literature provides dishonest, sanitized or even idealized views of poverty that do not ring true to actual lived experiences of lack and the daily struggles it imposes. For Cooley, “literary tradition” contains misleading falsehoods rather than honest portrayals of poverty’s difficulties and hardships.

Shakespeare on Beggary of Poor in Spirit

Posted by admin on Thursday, June 6, 2013

William Shakespeare in This King John quote emphasizes our discontent at both wealth and poverty, while focusing on finances at either end of the money spectrum. William Shakespeare said:
 
Well, whiles I am a beggar, I will rail, And say there is no sin but to be rich; And being rich, my virtue then shall be To say there is no vice but beggary Quote
 

“Well, whiles I am a beggar, I will rail, And say there is no sin but to be rich; And being rich, my virtue then shall be To say there is no vice but beggary” — William Shakespeare

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the William Shakespeare Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, William Shakespeare is putting words into the mouth of a character who is a beggar. The beggar states that while they are poor, they will complain about the unfairness of the system and say that the only sin is to be wealthy. But if they were to become rich, their new “virtue” or view would be that the only vice is poverty.

The best interpretation is that Shakespeare is highlighting the hypocrisy of how views can change depending on one’s own economic circumstances. Whether poor or rich, the character implies they will rail against the status that is opposite to their own.

The underlying message seems to be that judgments about wealth and poverty can be self-serving and lack objectivity, dependent on whether one stands to gain or lose from the system being criticized.

Birthday April 23, 1564 – Died April 23, 1616

Robert Ingersoll on Beggars Spending Like Kings

Posted by admin on Friday, February 8, 2013

Robert G. Ingersoll Money Quotation saying miserly kings are no better than a beggar if they hold tight to their money rather than releasing it to do good for the kingdom. Robert G. Ingersoll said:
 
I would rather be a beggar and spend my money like a king, than be a king and spend money like a beggar Quote
 

“I would rather be a beggar and spend my money like a king, than be a king and spend money like a beggar” — Robert G. Ingersoll

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Robert G. Ingersoll Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, Robert G. Ingersoll is contrasting two different approaches to spending money. On one hand, he suggests it would be preferable to live as a beggar but spend lavishly and enjoy life’s pleasures like a king. On the other hand, he says being an actual king but spending money in a miserly way like a beggar would be less desirable.

Ingersoll appears to value living fully and finding enjoyment in life above all else. The quote conveys that true happiness comes more from fully experiencing what life has to offer, even if one’s wealth is modest, rather than amassing wealth but failing to appreciate life’s rewards.

Ingersoll seems to be advocating for prioritizing quality of life and experiences over simply accumulating wealth or status.

Money Quotes Daily

Money Quotes Daily