Posts Tagged ‘alimony’

Robin Williams: Divorce Expensive

Posted by admin on Friday, September 9, 2022

Meaning of Robin Williams Money Quote: saying divorce is quite expensive and may even take more than expected, both financially and emotionally. Robin Williams said:
 
Divorce is expensive. call it 'all the money,' but they changed it to 'alimony.' It's ripping your heart out through your wallet Quote
 

“Divorce is expensive. I used to joke they were going to call it ‘all the money,’ but they changed it to ‘alimony.’ It’s ripping your heart out through your wallet” — Robin Williams

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Robin Williams Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

Robin Williams once joked that divorce is expensive, and it can take more than expected, both financially and emotionally. He said, “Divorce is expensive.

I used to joke they were going to call it ‘all the money,’ but they changed it to ‘alimony.’ It’s ripping your heart out through your wallet.” So, his divorce likely had a significant impact on both his wallet and heart.

Groucho Marx: Alimony Buying Hay

Posted by admin on Saturday, January 25, 2020

Groucho Marx Money Quote saying paying alimony is equivalent to feeding a dead horse. Groucho Marx said:
 
Alimony is like buying hay for a dead horse Quote
 

“Alimony is like buying hay for a dead horse” — Groucho Marx

 

Share </> Quote Image

Share the Groucho Marx Money quote image above on your site:

 
Short Link to this Quote:

[collapse]

 

In this quote, Groucho Marx seems to be making a wry comparison between alimony payments after a divorce and an illogical act. By likening alimony to “buying hay for a dead horse”, Marx implies that continuing financial support for an ex-spouse after a marriage has dissolved is nonsensical, since one cannot feed or benefit a deceased animal in the way a living one can be nourished. The joke plays on the absurdity of spending money on something no longer living or deriving sustenance.

Overall, the tone suggests Marx is satirizing alimony through absurdist humor, conveying his perspective that post-marital financial obligations to a former partner lack rationale once the relationship has concluded, much like purchasing food that cannot be consumed. The quote portrays Marx’s viewpoint through comedic metaphor rather than a literal argument, but implies alimony seemed illogical or pointless to him after a marriage terminated.

Money Quotes Daily

Money Quotes Daily